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The Magic of Writing Faster

This past weekend I attended a great workshop given by two publishing luminaries, Candace Havens and Liz Pelletier. Candace is known, at least in the romance writing community, for her online and in-person Fast Draft workshops.

For an indie author, writing fast is key. With some exceptions, indie publishing is a numbers game. We hear it all the time, write a series, release them as fast as you can. Four books a year is my goal, but there are plenty of authors who release far more frequently than that.

I want to write fast mostly to be able to tell all the stories inside of me within my lifetime. So many ideas, so little time. Banging out a book in a couple of weeks (or at least the first draft of a book) would go a long way towards meeting my goals and getting all these people out of my head.

According to Candace, there’s a zone you get into when writing fast where your subconscious takes over. I’ve definitely felt this. When inspiration hits, it’s like my fingers can’t write fast enough. Last summer, I wrote the first draft of my novel Earthsinger, 21,000 words in two days. (It’s since grown to 66,000.) The story flew from my fingertips and when I read it again, I didn’t even remember writing much of it.

Your subconscious is so powerful. Even though I haven’t yet matched that kind of speed, I can feel the wheels churning on my stories when I’m away from my computer. It’s a wonderful feeling to have that spark that comes when a problem you’ve been mulling over is solved. Things just click into place inside your head. Sometimes it feels like magic.

Here are some things that help me write faster:

  • Write, don’t edit. The writing/creative part of your brain and the editing/analytical part of your brain are incompatible. They compliment each other, but from a distance. Turn off your editor. Don’t read what you’ve written before. I use an Alphasmart Neo – with only 4 lines of text, and no annoying red lines indicating misspellings and errors.
  • Keep track of your daily word count. Use a notebook, a spreadsheet or an app. Keep track of time and number of words. It helps to know.
  • Know what you’re going to write before you sit down. Read this article if you haven’t. It changed my life. Even a pantser can visualize one scene at a time beforehand.
  • Don’t judge yourself. Writing fast can and will lead to a lot of crap, but there will be jewels in there as well. Clean it up later, at least you’ll have something to clean up!

If you’re interested in writing faster, I’d suggest taking Candace’s workshop either online or in-person at your first opportunity. The online version comes with a community for accountability where you post your daily page count to universal applause or nagging.

Other options for community include Camp Nanowrimo, which is starting again in July. You can choose “cabin mates” or have some chosen automatically for you – these are the folks that will keep you accountable on your mission for more words.

Maybe you won’t get to 5,000 words a day, but any increase in your daily word count gets you one step closer to that goal of a finished novel.

[well]Do you have any tips for increasing your word count? Let me know in the comments.[/well]

photo credit: √Čole via photopin cc

3 thoughts on “The Magic of Writing Faster”

  1. Great advice! I’d add have snacks on hand! Getting up to go to the fridge or snack cabinet will break your flow and get your distracted. I always keep nuts near my writing area.

    1. Oh, how could I forget snacks? Great tip! Apple slices and popcorn are my favorite writing aids!

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